Tag Archives: ACNR

Celebration of the World Migratory Bird Day 2011

This year 2011, ACNR in collaboration with the Rwanda Development Board (RDB) and the Rwanda Birding Association (RBA) organized a joint event. With RDB on board this was the first celebration of WMBD on a national level in Rwanda.


The Programme

The celebration of World Migratory Bird Day 2011 in Rwanda had 3 components.
1) A preliminary round table discussion was broadcasted live on Rwanda TV onwmbd_2 Thursday 12th May 2012, featuring
– Mrs Rica Rwigamba, Head of theTourism and ConservationDepartment at RDB to present the standpoint of the government on bird conservation and tourism,
– Mr Serge Nsengimana, ACNR Executive Director to call for conservation of Birds and their habitats in general and migratory birds in particular and
– Mr Davidson Mugisha, President of RBA to talk on behalf of eco-tourism operators in Rwanda.
2) A press release on World Migratory Bird Day 2011 and the events in Rwanda was sent out to prominent media in Rwanda to advertise the celebration. The press release was coordinated by ACNR and RDB.
3) Sunday 15th May 2011 was the day for a big bird watching event, aiming at catching people’s interest in birds and their protection needs while at the same time introducing the newly developed Bugesera Birding Circuit. It brought together more than 100 participants including RDB, ACNR and RBA staff, bird guides, Nature Club students, community members, media, tour operators, some diplomats like the US Ambassador, government officials and general public.

The event was held in Bugesera District, south of Kigali. Participants were assembled in three Birding Groups for different birding sites; one to two guides were available for each group. After birding, participants met at Gashora La Palisse Hotel, for refreshments and short boat rides on Lake Rumira. Speeches were held by the following individuals:
– Davidson Mugisha as MC, as an introduction and information on avi-tourism in Rwanda.
– The Mayor of Bugesera District to welcome the event.
– Bird watching group representatives to talk about their impressions from bird watching.
– An ACNR representative to recite a poem on the World Migratory Bird Day.
– Rica Rwigamba to thank all participants for coming and invite for lunch.

ACNR initiated the creation of a paper bird sculpture. For this purpose every participant received a paper bird to write on it his personal impressions, ideas and wishes concerning WMBD. Afterwards all paper birds were collected and will be hung up in the RDB entrance hall in a shape of big bird, where more than thousand people pass every day, to give the event an even bigger range.
RDB provided logistics for all participants, including transport and refreshments while ACNR provided all necessary information on birds, posters, fact sheets, buttons for all participants etc. Guides and birding materials were shared by all organizing parties.

wmbd_3

Conclusion
World Migratory Bird Day 2011 in Rwanda can be called a success. The collaboration of three able institutions substantially increased the range and diversity of the event, despite the time pressure of preparation at the last minute and ACNR’s financial constraints. Feedback from the participants and also the organizing parties was throughout positive, showing that the event had left a mark in people’s minds and will leave them thinking about birds and the threats they face.

A new start

Dear readers!

After quite a period of silence on this ACNR (see right) blog, we are now making a new start in publishing the latest news about conservation action in Rwanda.

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A fresh team of bloggers, consisting of the ACNR Director Serge, myself – Julia, Till, a new ACNR volunteer arriving from Germany very soon and sporadic guest bloggers, will from now on keep you up to date on ACNR’s projects, extraordinary environmental action and activities in Rwanda and stories from wildlife conservation work.

I hope you enjoy reading, and if you do, please spread the word!

Our environment depends on us!

All my best,

Julia

P.S. In the meantime, check out the ACNR homepage: www.acnrwanda.org

Waterbirds of Rweru

African Fish Eagles

Theogene, Serge, Mark, Fanny and Runyambo

The ACNR team set out to conduct a waterbird assessment in Lake Rweru. The team included Mark, Runyambo, Theogene, Fanny and Serge. It was an exciting academic adventure. We waded in the waters watched the wonderful birds and did a lot of counts.

White winged Tern Chlidonias leucopterus

Climate change, a Human rights Violation

Climate Change; A threat to Development; A human rights issue!

Within an international community based upon the rule of law and universal values of equality, human rights and dignity, it is surely wrong for small, vulnerable communities to suffer because of the actions of other more powerful resource-rich countries, actions over which they have no control, and little or no protection.‘ Gayoom, President of Maldives.

African farmers may safe the world”A coastal (Tureture) village in Papua New Guinea. later destroyed by water due to a sudden king tide (2007)”

People from the poorest countries are worst affected by global warming. Climate change impacts will definitely reverse the development prospects in these countries. Crop production is likely to reduce by half by 2020. This means the food crisis will get the African countries faster due to climate change. The people of the small island nations of the pacific (Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands Fiji etc) find most of their land under water due to king tides or cyclones; the people in the highlands of Kenya, Rwanda wake up one morning to find their crops moved and destroyed in landslides. AS I write this, the Turkanas of Kenya have moved to Uganda in search of pastures because of the drought that has hit their homeland. The herders and the police reservists accompanying are facing disarmament from the Ugandan militias and this will leave them cheap prey for the cattle rustlers from the other side. If they don’t die there, they will definitely loose their livelihoods source-their cattle. The cause of all this is the variability in climate which the Turkanas know nothing about nor have their actions contributed anything to the situation.

Human rights to development require international support to come to fruition”

Climate change has led to all these socio-economic strive in the underdeveloped countries. Industrialized countries release huge amounts of green house gases into the atmosphere daily and are causing this untold suffering to the underdeveloped countries. While the heavy polluters have the ability to mitigate or adapt to the impacts of climate change, the underdeveloped countries are highly vulnerable. They have little or no capacity to mitigate or adapt to the impacts of climate change. Human rights activists led by Mary Robinson, president, “Realizing Rights” (former president of Ireland); put their voices together to lobby for the realization of this important human rights violation. This was during an African Climate Change conference held in Kigali between

10th and 11th of September 2008. The Workshop was organized by the Rwanda Environment Management Authority (REMA) in partnership with the London School of Economics and

sponsored by the government of Rwanda, LSE Fund, BBC world Service Trust and Howell and Sharon. The conference brought together policy makers, civil society, academicians and politicians with an aim of strategizing on how the African poor can adapt or mitigate against the impacts of climate change. The government of Rwanda, led by president Paul Kagame has realized that climate variability threatens the livelihoods of her people and that an immediate action needs to be taken by all stakeholders to reduce their vulnerability. President Kagame said climate change was an issue that needed more attention by all to liberate the African people from the vicious circle of poverty. Obviously, this visionary leader has realized the weight of this issue and has given it the political weight it requires. He called on other African leaders and policy makers not to keep lamenting but see climate change as a challenge to economic development that needs to be addressed immediately.

Now, there is enough evidence that climate change is a human rights issue and the heavy polluters should pay to help support the development of the most vulnerable nations’ capacity to mitigate and adapt to these adverse impacts.

People from the poor underdeveloped countries are part of the more than 2000 million farmers in the world. The farmers are custodians of most what’s left of the world’s natural resources; holding in their hands the fate of thousands of threatened species as well as the world’s remaining forests.

“Under no Circumstances should a people be deprive of their right to a livelihood”

I concur with Julian Cribb (editor science alert) that these farmers could probably be the ones who can safe the world. The African farmer will not only need to feed the continent but also restore its forests, cleanse its waters, protect its wild species, improve its soils and absorb a substantial percentage of the carbon we all emit as we go about our lives. The farmers need first to be informed of this important role and be equipped with the right skills and ample funding to do this. The African continent has the potential to provide solutions to the climate change threats by replanting forests and sow new Agro-forests; design farming systems that enrich the soils with organic matter, thereby absorbing carbon out of the atmosphere instead of degrading it and releasing carbon; filter, cleanse and restore the fresh waters; use new science in some cases and re-apply old science in others to turn agriculture in much of the continent into the engine of economic growth and prosperity, thereby tackling the millennium goals of reducing poverty, hunger and disease. For example, by preparing and using humus, the farmers will facilitate arbiscular micorrhizal fungi to grow thereby absorbing a lot of organic carbon from the atmosphere and stabilizing the carbon cycle in the soil. This creates an economic commodity for farmers (sequestered carbon) and makes the land more valuable by improving soil and water conservation, thus enhancing both the economic and environmental components of adaptive capacity. The drier parts of Africa have the greatest potential of growing Jatropha trees which are a great source of bio-fuel, a clean source of energy that can run of most of the African economies. The pastoralists of semi-arid Africa could be holding the most important genes (in their livestock) that may safe the world in breeding animals that can adapt to hotter drier conditions we are definitely going to experience in the short to medium term.

Many African scientists have done very well in research in many areas including climate change. However, their skills and knowledge have not been utilized beyond the certificate in their briefcases and the research papers on their shelves. The African voices are seriously lacking on the negotiation tables like the Kyoto discussions. Grace Akumu of Climate Network Africa said that it is now important for African leaders to mainstream climate change in all economic development plans and take a lead in negotiating over the issue in the discussions. She further noted that more (donor funding) should be directed at supporting capacity to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change for more sustainable development.

“More of and active African Voices are needed on the negotiating tables. The heavy polluters have to realize that their emissions lead to violation of a fundamental human right- the right to live, among the underdeveloped countries” A united Africa can challenge the wet- the biggest polluters to slow down their rates of green house emissions while supporting the poor countries capacity to adapt and mitigate the unavoidable impacts of climate change. The forum observed that the climate human rights linkage needs more appropriate research to develop a model that can place responsibility on individual actors including the private sector. An international enforcement mechanism needs to be designed.

The media can play an important role in creating awareness and training people on how to adapt and mitigate climate change. Christine K of BBC World Service Trust advised journalists that the climate change should be appropriately presented to the African public. Climate change should not be presented as an environmental apocalypse but as a serious scenario which everyone in the world can do something to improve. The African people have a right to access of the right information regarding climate change and all forms of media should be used to bridge the gap.

The conference made a number of recommendations. More important is that more of African voices need to be heard more on the negotiating forums and more funding be availed to build the capacity of Africa to adapt to climate variability and climate change. Adaptation should not be used as a substitute to mitigation. Both are options for reducing the impacts of climate change in the short and long run and should be employed together.

All the necessary efforts should be made to respect and protect the fundamental human rights of poor, weaker and the marginalised, including the indigenous people; both locally and internationally.